1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.

Guess who's Dead.

Discussion in 'Music' started by Panja, Feb 14, 2016.

  1. zippy

    zippy The friendly Fascist

    Joined:
    Oct 27, 2006
    Messages:
    41,568
    Likes Received:
    1,263
    Supports:
    Sheffield United,FC Bayern
    Peter Tork from the Monkees last week and now one of the Prodigy has topped himself.
     
  2. m.oneillAVFC

    m.oneillAVFC Registered

    Joined:
    Oct 1, 2008
    Messages:
    9,782
    Likes Received:
    447
    Supports:
    Aston Villa
    Let me guess, you told him the White Album was crap .
     
  3. Panja

    Panja In a land down under

    Joined:
    Feb 12, 2014
    Messages:
    9,545
    Likes Received:
    976
    Location:
    Melbourne
    Supports:
    BCFC, you know, the one in Birmingham
    Deep down I think he already knew..
     
  4. Missy Moo

    Missy Moo Registered User

    Joined:
    Jan 6, 2013
    Messages:
    1,591
    Likes Received:
    344
    Supports:
    Man City
    Saddened to hear Ranking Roger from the Beat has passed at just 56..one of the best bands to see in a crowded small venue. He was non stop energy on stage, always had the crowd bouncing.
     
  5. PorkchopExpress

    PorkchopExpress The Blackfish

    Joined:
    Jan 31, 2015
    Messages:
    7,485
    Likes Received:
    2,205
    Location:
    Norn Iron
    Supports:
    Manchester United
    I was lucky enough to see the Beat with the full lineup in 2009 in Florida, as opposed to one of the two split versions that usually toured. They were great live.
     
  6. Panja

    Panja In a land down under

    Joined:
    Feb 12, 2014
    Messages:
    9,545
    Likes Received:
    976
    Location:
    Melbourne
    Supports:
    BCFC, you know, the one in Birmingham
    I saw them in 1978 (it could have been 79, it was a while back) in a punk/reggae/ska gig which featured Generation X, The Slits and Steel Pulse, in a pub in Birmingham. You could cut the air with a knife and snort it that night, which is probably why I can't remember what year it was..
     
  7. Habbinalan

    Habbinalan Registered User

    Joined:
    Jan 19, 2015
    Messages:
    943
    Likes Received:
    651
    Location:
    Edge of the Fen
    Supports:
    Cambridge United, with nostalgic connections to Barrow AFC
    25 years today that the great Lee Brilleaux passed.



     
    powerage likes this.
  8. Habbinalan

    Habbinalan Registered User

    Joined:
    Jan 19, 2015
    Messages:
    943
    Likes Received:
    651
    Location:
    Edge of the Fen
    Supports:
    Cambridge United, with nostalgic connections to Barrow AFC
    R.I.P. Jake Black a.k.a. The Very Reverend D.Wayne Love




     
    Panja likes this.
  9. Panja

    Panja In a land down under

    Joined:
    Feb 12, 2014
    Messages:
    9,545
    Likes Received:
    976
    Location:
    Melbourne
    Supports:
    BCFC, you know, the one in Birmingham
    If there is a more original debut album than Exile On Cold Harbour Lane then I am yet to hear it.

    I was lucky enough to see A3 live a couple of times, the first of which was at a pub in Southampton where they not only took the roof off but blew it into a million pieces.
     
  10. Habbinalan

    Habbinalan Registered User

    Joined:
    Jan 19, 2015
    Messages:
    943
    Likes Received:
    651
    Location:
    Edge of the Fen
    Supports:
    Cambridge United, with nostalgic connections to Barrow AFC
    I've probably seen them 6 or 8 times over the years. Fantastic live band.

    They're playing in a field in the middle of nowhere where me, my brother and a mate used to play in the beck and in the bracken as kids in the 60s. We lived on a farm and Tommy's dad was landlord of the Black Dog Inn. Hope they're still playing as it will be a great bit of nostalgia for me.

    DogFest 2019 at The Black Dog

    [​IMG]
     
    Panja likes this.
  11. Panja

    Panja In a land down under

    Joined:
    Feb 12, 2014
    Messages:
    9,545
    Likes Received:
    976
    Location:
    Melbourne
    Supports:
    BCFC, you know, the one in Birmingham
    Jake Black, a.k.a. The Very Reverend Dr. D. Wayne Love, co founder of the superb band, Alabama 3, has passed. He was some age.

    He was surrounded by family and friends when he dies and his last words were 'Tweet, tweet, Possil fleet', which the band are still trying to decipher.

    He is more widely known for penning the song 'Woke Up This Morning', which apparently was taken by some TV show in the States as it's theme tune.

     
    RednBlacklife likes this.
  12. Habbinalan

    Habbinalan Registered User

    Joined:
    Jan 19, 2015
    Messages:
    943
    Likes Received:
    651
    Location:
    Edge of the Fen
    Supports:
    Cambridge United, with nostalgic connections to Barrow AFC
  13. Habbinalan

    Habbinalan Registered User

    Joined:
    Jan 19, 2015
    Messages:
    943
    Likes Received:
    651
    Location:
    Edge of the Fen
    Supports:
    Cambridge United, with nostalgic connections to Barrow AFC
    They're all dropping off the perch.

    R.I.P. Roky Erickson

     
  14. Habbinalan

    Habbinalan Registered User

    Joined:
    Jan 19, 2015
    Messages:
    943
    Likes Received:
    651
    Location:
    Edge of the Fen
    Supports:
    Cambridge United, with nostalgic connections to Barrow AFC
    R.I.P. Doctor John

    This is one of my favourite versions of this classic.

     
  15. Habbinalan

    Habbinalan Registered User

    Joined:
    Jan 19, 2015
    Messages:
    943
    Likes Received:
    651
    Location:
    Edge of the Fen
    Supports:
    Cambridge United, with nostalgic connections to Barrow AFC
    R.I.P. Ian "Gibbo" Gibbons - Keyboard player with the Kinks, honorary Feelgood, also played with some greats.

    [​IMG]
     
  16. Habbinalan

    Habbinalan Registered User

    Joined:
    Jan 19, 2015
    Messages:
    943
    Likes Received:
    651
    Location:
    Edge of the Fen
    Supports:
    Cambridge United, with nostalgic connections to Barrow AFC
    EULOGY FOR JAKE BLACK

    ".....Dear Friends,

    All of you who knew and loved our dear departed Comrade and Teacher Jake Black, A.K.A the Reverend D. Wayne Love will understand why things have been a little quiet on this page for the last month or so. Its been a time of tears and reflection, also laughter in sharing our memories of this most brilliant man.

    Some of you, many of you, might be wondering how, or even if, we intend to carry on without the Reverend. Those of you who have truly absorbed his teachings will realise that such thoughts amount to Heresy.
    D.Wayne will never die - and his teachings carry on even as he assumes celestial form. Our Exile on Coldharbour Lane tour at the end of the year, will not be a memorial, but a celebration of his Ascension to Higher ground. He will be very much on stage with us, even if we have to blow the entire budget on animatronics and taxidermy. In the meantime, we thought we’d share with you this Eulogy for the great man, delivered by The Spirit at his funeral at Possill Park Chapel on Saturday the 15th of June 2019.

    Eulogy for Jake Black

    The first time I saw Jake I was 26 years old and hanging about with a bunch of queer anarchists in a tower block on the outskirts of Brixton. He was this skinny Scottish bloke in a Burberry cap, who lived in another flat up the stair. If I’m honest, I didn’t take much notice of him, but that might’ve been because I couldn’t understand a bloody word he was saying. He seemed nice enough; just another Chav - as we used to called them - looking to score.

    A year later I bumped into him at a party in the railway in Brixton. He was very friendly, even if I still couldn’t understand a word. And it confused me that he seemed to keep breaking into french modernist poetry. I wondered if he might be schizophrenic. He asked me what I was up to. I told him I was on my arse, looking for a room. His eyes lit up, and after a brief discussion we shook hands on thirty quid a week.

    It worked out pretty well for the first month or so. It was a two story, two bedroom flat with a nice big living room which he shared with his cat, Ice Cube, named after his favourite rapper. I didn’t see much of him to be honest - he was either out and about or holed up in his ‘scratch’ as he called it, reading paperbacks and listing to John Coltrane, Charles Mingus and Thelonius Monk. It was a paint-spattered boombox that sat on the shelf above his bed, next to his bottles of mysterious blue liquid.

    He seemed impressed when I showed him how to fiddle the budget electricity meter with the switch from an electric lighter, and I was impressed by his tape collection, and his tales of hanging out with Orange Juice, and editing their fan club magazine with his teenage sweetheart Kirsty.

    It was okay. He was pretty chilled out - a bit feral, but then so was I. Yeah, pretty good for a month or two. Until I got behind on the rent.

    At this point you could say I saw another side of the man. He proceeded to describe, in intricate, excruciating detail exactly what he was going to do to me if i didn’t come up with the money. A pair of pliers was involved, and it culminated with him throwing me out the ‘Windy’. A threat made more convincing by the fact we were living on the nineteenth floor. I think at that point I got a real sense of where he came from.

    I remember waking up in the morning to a dreadful Steve Earl cover by some band he said he was in. Alabama something. ‘He’ll never get anywhere with that’ I thought to myself…’and he’s far too old to be in a pop band.’

    We had to move out pretty soon after that. He hadn’t paid any rent for at least three years, and there was some issue about theft of electricity. I met him in the Prince Albert a week later, to give him the rest of what I owed him. I apologised profusely for being late, and he apologised for going all Possil on my Ass. He seemed depressed.

    ‘I’m just an auld ****’ he said. He was 35 years old.

    Four years later, we’re on the main stage at Glastonbury, playing that Steve Earle cover to 5,000 people. Two years after that, we’re in Hollywood, playing on the Jay Leno Show, and Jake’s hobnobbing with Kevin Spacey in the green room, in double breasted suit and wraparound shades. Funny old world…

    Over the next twenty years, I had the privilege of sharing stages with Jake all over the world, and getting to know this most original, funny and brilliant of men. I was supposed to be the posh, educated one, but Jake’s knowledge of literature, film, music and politics put me in the shade. In time, I learnt to understand at least 70 per cent of what he said, and it was worth it. Rarely have I met a man with such charisma, wit, and what used to be called ‘range’. One minute he would be expounding the merits of an obscure classic of Italian New Wave cinema, the next regaling you with his pitch perfect Bill Burroughs impression:

    “Smash the control images… Smash the control machine…”

    By the end, we had bonded, and I’m proud to say we were fast friends. There was an immense sense of freedom with Jake. He was a citizen of the world; in his own words he could ’talk to anybody’. This was demonstrated when he stayed with my Mum in Istanbul. Not speaking a word of Turkish, he befriended a room full of Turkish Football fans, scoring two sought-after tickets to see the Legendary Fenerbache football club. He had that kind of charisma. He was Present. He was Alive. He was there…he was Heavy.

    And he got around. He was a hep cat. He was solid gold.

    Our relationship wasn’t easy in the early days… if you crossed him, he could assassinate your character with merciless precision, at great volume. But as the years went by he attained a depth of sensitivity and wisdom. Some people get worse as the years go on. Jackie just got better and better. He evolved.

    After gigs, while the rest of us were getting coked up in the back of the bus, Jake would be reclining in front of the big screen in the downstairs lounge, watching Werckmeister Harmonies by Bella Tarr with a nice glass of Pinot Noir. Hanging out with Jake, at those moments, was pure sanctuary.

    He just had this extraordinary breadth of character - He could be deadly serious, and gloriously silly. He could be viciously cruel, and beautifully kind. He was intensely melancholy, and wonderfully joyful.

    He was so High you couldn’t get over him

    So wide, you couldn’t get around him

    So low, you couldn’t get under him

    The mighty Jake.

    Goodbye mate....."
     
  17. Panja

    Panja In a land down under

    Joined:
    Feb 12, 2014
    Messages:
    9,545
    Likes Received:
    976
    Location:
    Melbourne
    Supports:
    BCFC, you know, the one in Birmingham
    Yeah, I read that today on their FB page. Incredible stuff.

    I remember reading about the early days of A3 and Larry’s take on it was; “we met at an acid house party in Brixton and decided to create music that fused acid house with country, a bit like if Hank Williams was in The Happy Monday’s, then we took a load of disco biscuits and made it up as went along.
     
    Habbinalan likes this.

Share This Page